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Update on Pamela Colman-Smith

Posted by on 7:35 pm in Article, People | 13 comments

Update on Pamela Colman-Smith

Researching an enigma is fascinating, for not only do I have to read about her, I also have to read very much around Pamela Colman-Smith. Yet along the way, I am enjoying a range of experience from discussions with academics to people on Twitter sharing photos like this one. Thanks so much, Darren Jones.  Darren said: I bought a copy of The Russian Ballet from a charity book organisation. They described it as being an ex-library book which was puzzling as it was published in 1913. When I received it I found out that it had been a will bequest by a lady called Claudia Ayton – Lee to a private reference library run by the Old Vic theatre in 1955. And there it has been until sold it to me. On the title page was this picture. I’d never seen this picture before and nor had most other people! By a strange twist of fate, I also bumped into Tony Edwards, who was once Miss Smith’s errand boy. Tony and I were discussing her size. A lady walked across Nanny Moore’s Bridge in Bude and he said: “See that lady there? She was her colouring and her kind of height and size”. Brilliant. Best visual descriptor ever. The poor lady must have been bemused that we were staring at her, but all the reading in the world could not equate to...

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Fascinating insight into Bude’s history by the Old Cornwall Society

Posted by on 9:26 am in Article | 0 comments

Fascinating insight into Bude’s history by the Old Cornwall Society

Sent by Helen Hocking of the Old Cornwall Society (so glad to see people writing for the site): Once again, The Parkhouse Centre was a picture of community warmth and friendship, as the Bude, Stratton &  District branch of the ‘Old Cornwall Society’ gathered for their monthly talk. The events schedule is always full of  ‘Speakers’ from near and far, each with a subject matter closely connected to all things Cornish. This night was the turn of Society Chairman, Alan McIntosh. He did a sterling job, entertaining and informing a room of more than 70 members and guests all there to learn about, ‘The Edwards Family of Bude.’ With help from Malcolm Wright, (Vice-Chairman) who operated the computer alongside him,  Alan also shared a selection of quality photos taken from society archives. Anyone associated with Bude for a number of years will be familiar with the name of Sam Edwards Garage, having used their services on many occasions. Perhaps noting, in doing so, that drivers were not, as at today’s fuel pumps, expected to serve themselves! Yet, there inevitably comes a time when no one living remembers yesteryear first hand; this is where the beauty of a body like the Federation of Old Cornwall Societies can shine, as they bring to our lives something of our history disappeared forever. Starting with William Edwards, born 1760, in Minster Parish, Alan’s lively talk spanned the centuries up to modernity and included several historical references to Bude business, property and people. This was greatly appreciated by an audience able to recollect, or recognise a glimpse or two, of the town then, as clearly as they know and love it today. The memory shared by President, Owen May, of his Saturday morning job at said garage, when it was situated where the Co-op supermarket now resides, was one such example. Following the footsteps of William Edwards’ son who fought in the Napoleonic wars, Alan’s research told how John Edwards would walk to town, from St.Genny’s, to meet his sweetheart, Ann Pearce, daughter of a Waggoner from Launcells Parish. Married in 1857 they moved into Bude whereby John took a job, as Yard-man for Hocking and Hooper merchants, a company that once stood where the Strand Hotel no longer does, where famous street artist ‘Banksy’ is rumoured to have visited. Back before the breakwater was ever made, large baulks of timber were imported and unloaded on Summerleaze beach. From there, it was towed up the River Neet, beneath Nanny Moore’s bridge, as it was then, to be cut to boards. Archived slides of times long ago, picture the many fisherman’s boats moored up yards away from the steps of The Carriers Inn. John and Ann Edwards moved to 2, Lime Kiln cottages in about 1870,  he got a different job as a Lime Burner and this came with accommodation. Hard and exhausting work, burnt limestone was highly sought after, by the building industry. However, due to cheaper transport costs, the lime trade declined. In 1890, John and his family moved to 2, Morwenna Terrace starting up a Posting House that would sort and deliver mail to the whole district. Today the site of Arthur W Bryant Funeral Service the Post House stabled the many horses required to deliver and relay the mail and in light...

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A Stratton Smallholder

Posted by on 9:23 pm in Article, Stratton | 0 comments

A Stratton Smallholder

More from Dawn’s interview With John Going, aged 94: I sold my Stratton smallholding to a neighbour and then he split it up. It was in a ring fence, at the Town’s End side of Stratton. Stratton was a nice little place. That’s one of the things that attracted me to it. When I came here, the sun was shining, the grass was green, it was warm, and people were tearing about with tractors. I was in Stratton for 30 odd years. Stratton was good. All I had to do was walk from the end of the road and there was the town. Everything was still rationed. There were 4 grocers, 2 shoemakers, a chemist opposite the old surgery, an ironmonger’s, a self-contained unit, 2 butchers almost opposite each other, 3 pubs, a tailor’s. Fewer cars than we have now which was an advantage. I went to the shoe shop near the junction because he’d fought on the same battlefield as my uncle. Bissets? Stratton had a good cattle market but Holsworthy was rather better though the same auctioneer did both. In the early stages when I came here, government suppliers were buying beef for the army. There was good competition and prices. I left farming because I was bloody-minded. There was a lot of pressure from changes of government. They wanted loads and loads of cheap food, as much as they could get. People wanted it for nothing. There was a fresh lot of rules with each government from the Ministry of Agriculture. I got pushed into a corner and decided to get rid of it. I was sad to get rid of the cattle as I’d been breeding consistently. I was hot-headed at the time but I was married by then and we’d got three kids (I married a widow with 2 children) and they needed feeding. Very seldom did I go to Bude. Bude was a foreign country, really.  I had friends in Bude but it was very small then, 4000 or so people altogether. There was banter between Stratton and Bude, it was so intertwined. I’d walk across Broadclose Farm via Pathfields. I used to walk to Bude. There were always skylarks over Broadclose. The Holsworthy & Stratton Agricultural Association had their first postwar agricultural show on...

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